Using technology to get the maximum outcomes for A Level Practical Assessment


This post was written by Gary Walters. You can follow Gary on Twitter @NorthKestevenPE

It seems to be a re-occurring question for AS / A2 teachers on how do we get the best evidence for our student’s practical marks for A Level PE.

 

What do I need to get video of? How long for? What’s the best angle? How do I keep the rest of the students focused whilst I record 412 crosses sailing off in all sorts of directions.

 

I’ve experimented, like many, with all sorts of video recording equipment,with limited success: Time consuming, Weather dependent, Performer dependent, Peer dependant. And still no guarantee you’ve covered all those core skills.

 

Recently I’ve given the control over to the students. And it seems to have worked.

 

Whether they have responded to having ownership of the task, whether it’s down to less pressure of performing on demand for staff, or whether it’s the technology. But something seems to have clicked.

 

Students feedback says technology is the key. iPhones and apps such as @Ubersense and @Coach’sEye and mini flip cameras for those not caught up in the Apple storm. Most students are now more ‘au fait’ with the technology than we are. Most have iPhones. So why not let them use it.

 

I started by telling the students what I expected. Research the demonstrations and drills that would allow them to showcase their array of skills and techniques that would fulfil the assessment criteria. I expected the students to use the flip cameras at weekends or overnight to use with their parents / peers to get evidence and to take to their own training sessions where specialised coaches would help with the most relevant drills. Students with iPhones quickly realised they had a library in their hand – the specification and unlimited examples of drills and elite models of technique and the most powerful weapon – the vast array of apps that can perform all manner of analysis.

 

Using the assessment criteria, the achievement criteria and models of elite athletes performance they came up with some really great evidence. Most used @CoachesEye / @Ubersense to  record themselves back and created a Dropbox full of evidence ready for their A2 self-analysis – something I’ve found students initially find difficult so it gives them a wonderful starting point.

 

By creating an AS PE Dropbox account for all the students’ core skills demonstrations it also got everything in one place. Instant feedback for the students from staff, Peer assessment, Easy for moderation, Easy to update, easy to use at a standardisation meeting with other like-minded PE staff and great for students to find out about how they should prepare evidence.

 

Students started to use and develop analytical skills in great depth when performing the core skills using apps such as iMuscle because they were enthused about competing against themselves and their peers to get the best evidence – skills that will be of so much benefit at A2 when writing their comparison to elite and self analysis sections.

 

I strongly believe the increase in quality in evidence is down to the student’s engagement & motivation of using new technology. I think I’ve only just touched the tip of the iceberg and I’m sure there’s some brilliant ways out there of empowering the students and their use of technology to get the maximum out of their practical assessments.

It seems to be a re-occurring question for AS / A2 teachers on how do we get the best evidence for our student’s practical marks for A Level PE.

 

What do I need to get video of? How long for? What’s the best angle? How do I keep the rest of the students focused whilst I record 412 crosses sailing off in all sorts of directions.

 

I’ve experimented, like many, with all sorts of video recording equipment,with limited success: Time consuming, Weather dependent, Performer dependent, Peer dependant. And still no guarantee you’ve covered all those core skills.

 

Recently I’ve given the control over to the students. And it seems to have worked.

 

Whether they have responded to having ownership of the task, whether it’s down to less pressure of performing on demand for staff, or whether it’s the technology. But something seems to have clicked.

 

Students feedback says technology is the key. iPhones and apps such as @Ubersense and @Coach’sEye and mini flip cameras for those not caught up in the Apple storm. Most students are now more ‘au fait’ with the technology than we are. Most have iPhones. So why not let them use it.

 

I started by telling the students what I expected. Research the demonstrations and drills that would allow them to showcase their array of skills and techniques that would fulfil the assessment criteria. I expected the students to use the flip cameras at weekends or overnight to use with their parents / peers to get evidence and to take to their own training sessions where specialised coaches would help with the most relevant drills. Students with iPhones quickly realised they had a library in their hand – the specification and unlimited examples of drills and elite models of technique and the most powerful weapon – the vast array of apps that can perform all manner of analysis.

 

Using the assessment criteria, the achievement criteria and models of elite athletes performance they came up with some really great evidence. Most used @CoachesEye / @Ubersense to  record themselves back and created a Dropbox full of evidence ready for their A2 self-analysis – something I’ve found students initially find difficult so it gives them a wonderful starting point.

 

By creating an AS PE Dropbox account for all the students’ core skills demonstrations it also got everything in one place. Instant feedback for the students from staff, Peer assessment, Easy for moderation, Easy to update, easy to use at a standardisation meeting with other like-minded PE staff and great for students to find out about how they should prepare evidence.

 

Students started to use and develop analytical skills in great depth when performing the core skills using apps such as iMuscle because they were enthused about competing against themselves and their peers to get the best evidence – skills that will be of so much benefit at A2 when writing their comparison to elite and self analysis sections.

 

I strongly believe the increase in quality in evidence is down to the student’s engagement & motivation of using new technology. I think I’ve only just touched the tip of the iceberg and I’m sure there’s some brilliant ways out there of empowering the students and their use of technology to get the maximum out of their practical assessments.

It seems to be a re-occurring question for AS / A2 teachers on how do we get the best evidence for our student’s practical marks for A Level PE.

What do I need to get video of? How long for? What’s the best angle? How do I keep the rest of the students focused whilst I record 412 crosses sailing off in all sorts of directions.

I’ve experimented, like many, with all sorts of video recording equipment,with limited success: Time consuming, Weather dependent, Performer dependent, Peer dependant. And still no guarantee you’ve covered all those core skills.

Recently I’ve given the control over to the students. And it seems to have worked.

Whether they have responded to having ownership of the task, whether it’s down to less pressure of performing on demand for staff, or whether it’s the technology. But something seems to have clicked.

Students feedback says technology is the key. iPhones and apps such as @Ubersense and @Coach’sEye and mini flip cameras for those not caught up in the Apple storm. Most students are now more ‘au fait’ with the technology than we are. Most have iPhones. So why not let them use it.

I started by telling the students what I expected. Research the demonstrations and drills that would allow them to showcase their array of skills and techniques that would fulfil the assessment criteria. I expected the students to use the flip cameras at weekends or overnight to use with their parents / peers to get evidence and to take to their own training sessions where specialised coaches would help with the most relevant drills. Students with iPhones quickly realised they had a library in their hand – the specification and unlimited examples of drills and elite models of technique and the most powerful weapon – the vast array of apps that can perform all manner of analysis.

Using the assessment criteria, the achievement criteria and models of elite athletes performance they came up with some really great evidence. Most used @CoachesEye / @Ubersense to record themselves back and created a Dropbox full of evidence ready for their A2 self-analysis – something I’ve found students initially find difficult so it gives them a wonderful starting point.

By creating an AS PE Dropbox account for all the students’ core skills demonstrations it also got everything in one place. Instant feedback for the students from staff, Peer assessment, Easy for moderation, Easy to update, easy to use at a standardisation meeting with other like-minded PE staff and great for students to find out about how they should prepare evidence.

Students started to use and develop analytical skills in great depth when performing the core skills using apps such as iMuscle because they were enthused about competing against themselves and their peers to get the best evidence – skills that will be of so much benefit at A2 when writing their comparison to elite and self analysis sections.

I strongly believe the increase in quality in evidence is down to the student’s engagement & motivation of using new technology. I think I’ve only just touched the tip of the iceberg and I’m sure there’s some brilliant ways out there of empowering the students and their use of technology to get the maximum out of their practical assessments.

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